Photo Media Student Awarded at 2016 Photobook New Zealand Festival

< Whitecliffe Educated: Student Experience | Whitecliffe Graduates & Lecturer in 'Tautai Navigate' >

Photo Media Student Awarded at 2016 Photobook New Zealand Festival

Georgia Periam received ‘Highly Commended’ for her photobook The Inbetween at the New Zealand Photobook of the Year Awards (NZPOTY). The awards were announced at the inaugural Photobook New Zealand Festival held from 11-13 March at Massey University, Wellington. Georgia’s photobook was awarded, alongside other titles from practicing New Zealand artists, photographers and photobook makers including Yvonne Todd, Mark Purdom, Shelley Jacobson, Solomon Mortimer and David Straight. Judges for the award included photographer/lecturer David Cook, photographer Harvey Benge, gallerist Paul McNamara, Photoforum Director Geoffrey Short and Open Lab Massey University Director Anna Brown. The judges’ comments for her photobook: “The Inbetween presents a nutty and playful engagement with the New Zealand landscape, and its whimsical humour can be appreciated by photography critics and lovers alike. Its embossed red cover reflects the story that plays out on the pages inside.”

When the award was announced, Georgia said, “I was overwhelmed and relieved to be acknowledged for my photography work outside of the school environment. I am thrilled to be listed amongst the high caliber photographers and photobook makers practicing in New Zealand today.” Georgia’s photobook, The Inbetween, was self-published as part of the Whitecliffe Photo Media Department's new curriculum, which introduced the photobook format for the first time to Year 3 students last year. Students presented their photobooks at the Whitecliffe end-of-year exhibitions in November 2015.

Georgia describes her first photobook; “The Inbetween is a dedication to that moment in childhood where innocence is lost and all you have is yourself. It is a reflection of my childhood that finished much too soon. Life was a dark and twisted fairytale, including a wicked stepmother and twin sisters, without the happy ever after. Each image is a childhood memory. As I relived each moment I played with the concept of memories being fluid and changeable, and created new meanings for these rural landscapes. The horizon line is a recurring visual, symbolising an unreachable, idyllic place where anything is possible.”

We congratulate Georgia on her achievement.


<< News  < Whitecliffe Educated: Student Experience | Whitecliffe Graduates & Lecturer in 'Tautai Navigate' >